Dublin City Interfaith Forum

  1. S
  2. M
  3. T
  4. W
  5. T
  6. F
  7. S
    1.  
    2.  
    3. 1
    4. 2
    5. 3
    6. 4
    7. 5
    1. 6
    2. 7
    3. 8
    4. 9
    5. 10
    6. 11
    7. 12
    1. 13
    2. 14
    3. 15
    4. 16
    5. 17
    6. 18
    7. 19
    1. 20
    2. 21
    3. 22
    4. 23
    5. 24
    6. 25
    7. 26
    1. 27
    2. 28
    3. 29
    4. 30
    5. 31
    6.  
    7.  

News

Thursday 29th August 2019

Categories:
All faiths, Integration, Mutuality, Pluralism, Respect, United

“Hate crime has no place in today’s Ireland”

Press Release

For immediate release: 29 August 2019

Archbishop of Dublin Expresses Solidarity With Muslim Community

“Hate crime has no place in today’s Ireland”

The Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin has expressed sorrow and solidarity with members of Muslim communities who have experienced racist attacks or prejudice. Archbishop Michael Jackson has written to Imams and leaders of Mosques and Muslim centres in Dublin saying that recent incidents in which Muslim people have been targeted must be condemned.

His letter, sent in advance of Jummah Prayer on Friday, follows a number of incidents this month in which members of the Muslim community have been targeted. Hearing the call of Muslim leaders, Dr Jackson has urged all Irish citizens to take a stand against prejudice and racism.

“Recent events which have taken place in relation to those of Cultures and Faiths other than the majority culture in Ireland must be condemned. Our sympathy for those who are attacked and humiliated, by action and by word, has to be our priority. So too has a sense of shame at the acts perpetrated against these people with entitled cruelty leading to individual humiliation and personal violation. Hate crime has no place in today’s Ireland,” he wrote.

He continued to say that our wellbeing is grounded in our shared humanity which is upheld by dignity and respect. This must include dignity and respect for ‘The Other’ in our society, he said, adding that while The Other is different from us, he or she is also our neighbour.

“We hear the voice of concern raised by our neighbours who are members of Muslim communities in Ireland and urge all Irish citizens to stand against prejudice directed against minorities in whatever form they find it and in whatever way they feel they can. Friendship and hospitality march hand in hand with justice and compassion,” he concluded.

The full text of Archbishop Jackson’s letter is below:

On behalf of the Church of Ireland community I wish to express our sorrow and our solidarity to all who have suffered trauma and injury resulting from acts of hatred that have no place in our society.

Recent events which have taken place in relation to those of Cultures and Faiths other than the majority culture in Ireland must be condemned. Our sympathy for those who are attacked and humiliated, by action and by word, has to be our priority. So too has a sense of shame at the acts perpetrated against these people with entitled cruelty leading to individual humiliation and personal violation. Hate crime has no place in today’s Ireland.

Our wellbeing is grounded in our shared humanity. This humanity is upheld by a range of basic values of dignity and respect. Dignity and respect for ourselves simply are not sufficient. They have to move out to embrace The Other in our society particularly when The Other is different from us. The Other is also our neighbour and has every bit as much entitlement to safety and freedom of movement and of speech as we have.

We hear the voice of concern raised by our neighbours who are members of Muslim communities in Ireland and urge all Irish citizens to stand against prejudice directed against minorities in whatever form they find it and in whatever way they feel they can. Friendship and hospitality march hand in hand with justice and compassion.

+Michael

Archbishop of Dublin